Java

Java (programming language)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Java language” redirects here. For the natural language from the Indonesian island of Java, see Javanese language.
Not to be confused with JavaScript.
Java

Paradigm Object-oriented, structured, imperative
Appeared in 1995
Designed by Sun Microsystems (Now owned by Oracle Corporation)
Developer James Gosling & Sun Microsystems
Stable release Java Standard Edition 6 (1.6.0_21) (July 7, 2010; 2 months ago)
Typing discipline Static, strong, safe, nominative, manifest
Major implementations OpenJDK, HotSpot, many others
Dialects Generic Java, Pizza
Influenced by Ada 83, C++, C#,[1] Delphi Object Pascal,[2] Eiffel,[3] Generic Java, Mesa,[4] Modula-3,[5] Objective-C,[6] UCSD Pascal,[7][8] Smalltalk
Influenced Ada 2005, BeanShell, C#, Clojure, D, ECMAScript, Groovy, J#, JavaScript, PHP, Python, Scala
OS Cross-platform (multi-platform)
License GNU General Public License / Java Community Process
Usual file extensions .java, .class, .jar
Website For Java Developers
Java Programming at Wikibooks

Duke, the Java mascot
Java is a programming language originally developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems (which is now a subsidiary of Oracle Corporation) and released in 1995 as a core component of Sun Microsystems’ Java platform. The language derives much of its syntax from C and C++ but has a simpler object model and fewer low-level facilities. Java applications are typically compiled to bytecode (class file) that can run on any Java Virtual Machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented language that is specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers “write once, run anywhere”. Java is currently one of the most popular programming languages in use, and is widely used from application software to web applications.[9][10]
The original and reference implementation Java compilers, virtual machines, and class libraries were developed by Sun from 1995. As of May 2007, in compliance with the specifications of the Java Community Process, Sun relicensed most of its Java technologies under the GNU General Public License. Others have also developed alternative implementations of these Sun technologies, such as the GNU Compiler for Java, GNU Classpath, and Dalvik.

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